Business Disaster Plan

When we think of disasters that can affect our businesses, we often think of floods, fires and tornadoes, but are you prepared in case a blackout or computer virus attempt to cripple your business?

I was talking to a small business owner recently about some of his upcoming jobs.  In the discussion, he mentioned the estimates he emails to his customers and how sometimes he’ll send a text to them with quotes or cost for upgrades.  This reminded me about how much we rely on our computers and now our smart phones and how susceptible we are to losing all of our stored information if a virus attacks our computer or if our phone dies and we lose all of our contacts and previous emails.  Most of us think we are covered if we back up our information to USB drives or to SD cards, but these can also corrupt and you can lose all the stored information from there as well.  Your company may have an external company that handles all of your IT needs so you might feel pretty confident that all of your files are backed up, but what if they don’t back up your files every month.  Could you operate if you lost one to six months worth of information?

PHC is currently finishing up a job for a church building that sustained fire and water damage in Raleigh.  The church was able to prevent further damage to the building because they had a list of contractors to call in case of an emergency.  We also worked on a large commercial loss water loss in Lillington whose damage would have been more severe if it weren’t for the quick thinking of an employee who knew where the water shut off was located and was able to get the water turned off shortly after discovering the damage.  In both of these incidents, the buildings were closed while mitigation was performed and alternate plans were made to re-open the businesses.

You may be asking yourself why would I write a blog about these different scenarios?  What would a small business owner, a commercial building and a church all need to have in place?  The answer is simple, a business disaster plan.

Ready.gov suggests that every business conduct a risk assessment which can identify potential hazards and analyzes what could happen if a hazard occurs.  Hazards can range from hurricanes and tornadoes to power outages or a death of an employee.  It is essential that the business owner or next in command knows what to do to keep your business operational even if you can’t physically enter your place of business.  Let PHC Restoration be a part of your business disaster plan as well.  We can educate you and your employees of what can be done shortly after a loss to possibly reduce the amount of damage to your property by simply knowing where the shut off valves are located and how to turn them off.  It is also important to know who to call and have someone familiar with your property if a disaster does strike.  The church I spoke about above had a roofer to call which led to their roof being tarped the morning after the fire and in plenty of time so that the rain forecasted for the next day was not able to cause any additional damage.  Knowing who to call is just as important as knowing what to do.

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